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Flashman and the Mountain of Light (The Flashman Papers, Book 4)

In addition to his novels he also wrote numerous screenplays, most notably The Three Musketeers and the James Bond film Octopussy. George MacDonald Fraser died in January at the age of Publication Data Place of Publication. Show more Show less.


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Ratings and reviews Write a review. The Flashman years Riveting and quite outrageous, not at all politically correct thank God. Wicca Book of Spells: The Big Spell Book: May 18, Raegan Butcher rated it liked it. If any criticism can be leveled at the Flashman books it is that they are heavily formulaic. Each novel invariably features Flashman going undercover in an exotic foreign land, wearing some sort of native garb, bedding a wild variety of women, escaping with his life from some of the most memorable Victorian era battles, disasters and massacres.

As such, this is a solid, if unspectacular entry in the series featuring more sex and palace intrigue than usual. May 21, Sarbjit rated it it was amazing. Harry Flashman gets roped in to India in , just in time to witness yet another attempt to kick out the English. Of course there is a women in power for Flashman to hook up with, along with in maid in waiting. All the while trying to stay as far away from the fighting as possible, only to have the war sneak up on him. Another fine audio edition of a Flashman novel narrated by the brillant David Case.

I'm going to be honest, this is quite possibly my favorite of the Flashman books so far. The only possible criticism here is that the supporting players, the lascivious Jeendan, the mad Americans Gardner and Harlan, old Goolab Singh, and the setting, full of Grand War and Ancient Treasures and Deep Treachery, almost threatens to overshadow old Flashy, who is in a land so crooked that it's all Our Harry can do just to keep up.

Rollicking good read anyway. Jun 01, Muthuprakash Ravindran rated it really liked it. Why Flashman is so much fun to read? Probably because he is such a scoundrel who will sell his mother to save his hide and will boast about it as well? Here he is fresh from his ordeals in Madagascar and lands in the middle of the First Anglo-Sikh war and all the intrigues it involved.

The old hands from the Afghan war are here, Broadfoot, Havelock, Sale etc with some more newer ones ready to Why Flashman is so much fun to read?


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The old hands from the Afghan war are here, Broadfoot, Havelock, Sale etc with some more newer ones ready to start the fight to complete the conquest of India. Fraser mentions in the footnotes, it is fascinating to see the same names of British officers and generals popping up all around during the initial growth of the Empire and no doubt, the British Empire can be said to be built by these handful of guys. Flashman provides a character study of each of these guys in his own way, ends up in the durbar of Lahore and meets the 'Messalina' of India. There is intrigue everywhere, treason, generals conspiring to lose and much more.

An interesting side story is Raja Goolab Singh in the middle of action trying to become the king of Kashmir. While Flashman gallops in the middle of action everywhere it is his memoirs anyway! Another foot note of interesting story is about the Punjabi general, Gurdana Khan, a. The Americans, a German prince, the Sikhs and the British themselves prove that there is the world at stake here in that deadly war fought by the Khalsa led by its inept generals.

What is mind-boggling for me, at least is the amount of foot notes the book has and except Flashman, the entire book is full of people who actually played the part in the war which actually happened.

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That is probably all the more reason for loving it. While Flashman is fiction, the rest is history. Thus, the book introduces so much of information to process and take in. Each of these people have written memoirs, travelogues etc and there are references to it all along the book and the to-be-read list of books just keep on increasing. I think, that in essence, is why Flashman is so much interesting to read. That and the antics of Flashman of course. With his ready wit and absolute cowardliness, he is charming and irresistible. Sped through it in two days, licked my chops, and wanted to reach for the next episode.

This is the third in the series I've read, and once again I'm in awe of the depth of GMF's scholarship and ability to insert Flashy plausibly into the most implausible circumstances.

Flashman and the Mountain of Light by George MacDonald Fraser

The First American in Afghanistan by Ben Mcintyre, but otherwise remained more or less blissfully ignorant of the main A ripping yarn. The First American in Afghanistan by Ben Mcintyre, but otherwise remained more or less blissfully ignorant of the main event in question, the first Anglo-Sikh War of Ever wonder how that admirable warrior race, the Sikhs, came to be among the British Raj's most faithful troops? Well, this volume went a long ways towards explaining it. Along the way are GMF's usual cast of incredibly colorful -- and even more impressively, historical - characters, including a power-hungry nymphomaniac rani Jind Kaur, whom Flashman calls "Jeendan" , not one but two American adventurers Josiah Harlan and Alexander Gardner , and the sort of warts-and-all portraits of the British command Hugh Gough, Henry Hardinge, et al.

The footnotes are an amateur historians delight, and it's just about all I can do not to hare off to find copies of such promising references as Lady Sale's Journal of the Disasters in Affghanistan , for one. And where did GMF come up with such a command of the native terms of abuse and odd bits of market palaver? Mined from contemporary accounts? Whatever the case, it was delightful. One note of disappointment nothing to do with the book per se , mind you: I had wanted to link to a romping good website I'd once found devoted to Flashman, which included with plot synopses and reams of Flashman trivia, but all that seems to remain these days is the Wikipedia entry most others have been shut down or disappeared, presumably under legal duress rather than for lack of stamina.

It's a pity, as some of them were quite entertaining.

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Ah, well; there are always the books. And that's what counts, ain't it?

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Feb 10, Ensiform rated it it was amazing Shelves: With this volume, we find Flashy in the Punjab in , witnessing and spying in the first Sikh War or Rebellion, if you look at it from the British view. It is the ninth of the Flashman novels. Presented within the frame of the supposedly discovered historical Flashman Papers, this book describes the bully Flashman from Tom Brown's School Days.

The papers are attributed to Flashman, who is not only the bully featured in Thomas Hughes ' novel, but also a well-known Victorian military hero.

Flashman 5. - George MacDonald Fraser

The book begins with an explanatory note detailing the discovery of these papers. He is dispatched by Major George Broadfoot to the Punjab, masquerading as a solicitor attempting to settle the Soochet legacy. Flashman becomes entangled in the intrigues of the Punjabi court before being forced to flee at the outbreak of war, then becomes involved in plans by the Punjabi nobility to curb the power of the Khalsa.

Returning to the relative safety of the British forces, Flashman arrives just in time to become an unwilling participant in the attack on Ferozeshah.